‘Complementary therapy should not be used as alternative treatment’

National 1 minute, 44 seconds

BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN

COMPLEMENTARY therapy should not be used as an alternative form of medication when treating a disease, said a Singapore based therapist recently.

Singaporean body therapist Yonie Bonawi, who was in the sultanate to deliver a talk on ‘Journey towards better health and wellness’, said many people often confuse complimentary therapies as alternative forms of treatment.

According to Yonie, complementary therapies are used alongside medical treatments prescribed by health professionals that can help patients cope better with symptoms of diseases, while alternative therapies are treatment used in place of conventional medicine.

She said that complimentary health therapies such as traditional massages, herbal medicines and aromatherapy should be used along with the medical care they get from their health care provider, noting that these therapies are supposed to complement and aid medical treatment rather than being used as a sole treatment for a disease.

“It should not be seen as a complete substitute. It’s a compliment to the medicines you are prescribed with. It’s not an alternative,” she said.

The certified body therapist with 10 years of experience added that people should be wary when opting for complimentary therapies, noting that “what suits other people may not suit you.”

Yonie, who runs a health practice in Singapore has treated people from Malaysia and Indonesia, and according to the body therapist, many of her clients have shown positive results from using aromatherapy – a form of complementary therapy.

She said aromatherapy can help children and adults with health and wellness issues ranging from chronic insomnia and Autism.

While there is not enough research to tell whether aromatherapy can help people with chronic diseases, she said it has shown to help her clients with cold and flu, treating illnesses similarly to medicines, as well as helping children with special needs.

“I’ve treated special needs children from Indonesia and Malaysia with the help of essential oils and they’ve all shown positive effects,” she said, adding that aromatherapy can help reduce stress in children by stimulating their cranial nerves and allowing them to heal naturally.

The Brunei Times